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Volume 23
Issue 2
March 2012

 

Contents:

  • Features
    • Features
      • When the therapist is a horse Nicola Banning
        • Equine facilitated therapy is about entering the horse’s environment and using their presence to reflect back a sense of self. Nicola Banning describes her own, revelatory experience on a two-day workshop

      • Too little, too late? Charles Gore
        • The Government has recently agreed to fund counselling for the thousands of people infected with hepatitis C and/or HIV from infected NHS blood. Charles Gore tells the sorry tale

      • The Leicester conference experience
        • The annual Leicester Conference offers participants the opportunity to analyse and experience what makes groups work. Mannie Sher and Coreene Archer describe a potentially transformative process

    • Cover feature
      • Poetry, please Sarah Van Gogh
        • Therapy should use the poetic and the scientific together to reflect and articulate the experience of the client, argues Sarah Van Gogh

    • News feature
      • What do young people want? Catherine Jackson
        • The Department of Health has recently announced further investment to improve access to talking therapies for children and young people. Catherine Jackson talks to researchers and practitioners about what’s being offered

  • Regulars
    • Columns
      • In training – Back in the client’s chair Marc Brammer
        • Something that has really struck me since I started my training is the distance I’ve come from my own first session with a counsellor to where I am today, working with clients on placement as part of my diploma studies

      • In the client's chair – Who is this man? Caitin Wishart
        • Sometimes I can’t believe I’ve spent three years in the company of my therapist yet I know nothing about him. He is a man who sits opposite me in a chair, week in week out, and I have no idea who he is outside of this context

      • In practice – Friend or therapist? Julia Bueno
        • A dear friend of mine has been going through hell in her increasingly desperate attempts to work out if she should leave her partner. The relationship has been breaking down, slowly but surely, over a number of years – ever since the birth of their first child

    • Editorial
      • Editorial Sarah Browne
        • Up and down the country horses are being used to work therapeutically with a range of conditions – addiction, depression, PTSD and even autism

    • Letters
      • Beware the back to work industry Diane Collingwood
        • In the February issue we have the exposition on how counsellors can get involved in offering their services to get the jobless back to work by Catherine Jackson and, in Talking Point, Andy Rogers reflects on his experiences working with students now in austerity Britain

      • What about the workless? Clare Slaney
        • The October 2009 issue published an article called ‘Work is good for you’. It was illustrated by a picture of a god-like figure – the counsellor – holding a key with which he winds up tiny broken people on one side of him and, on the other side, sends them on their happy, straight-backed, employed way

      • Unethical opportunities? Andy Rogers
        • I hardly know where to start with the unspoken ethical dilemmas surrounding the news of ‘huge opportunities’ for therapists reported in 'Counselling the jobless back to work'

      • Stop this undignified scramble William Johnston
        • It must be 30 years ago that I heard the trade unionist, Clive Jenkins, express the view that a return to full employment was a myth that would never materialise, and that what mattered now was to educate people into leisure

      • If I could work I would Denice Reeves
        • Here is a brief synopsis of who I am and what’s currently occurring, causing me to actually ‘get things out there’ about the Welfare Reform Bill

      • Damaging pragmatism Roslyn Byfield
        • I read ‘Counselling for depression’ (Therapy Today, February 2012) with mixed feelings. While it’s good to see BACP at the NHS/IAPT ‘top table’, helping to ensure the provision of counselling within IAPT services, it comes at a cost that does not seem to have been recognised

      • Hidden costs of data collection
        • Nic Streatfield makes an interesting case for routine collection of outcome measures. I wonder, however, if his situation is typical. Where he works, clients are able to input the data themselves thereby both saving the therapist time and involving the client more deeply in the process

      • What about the lesbians? Carly Hall
        • I read David Richards’ article ‘Working with older LGBT people’ with interest. However, there are some issues that I would like to raise in the interests of older lesbians. I speak as a lesbian growing older, a client, a healthcare professional and a researcher

    • Questionnaire
      • Questionnaire – John McLeod
        • Counsellor, research consultant and former academic, John McLeod believes in the power of art-making as a fundamental human activity that can help change the world

    • Day in the life
      • Dr Maria-Alicia Ferrera-Pena is a volunteer bereavement counsellor in a category B prison for male offenders

    • Reviews
      • In search of self
        • Why be happy when you could be normal? Jeanette Winterson, Jonathan Cape 2011, £14.99, ISBN 978-0224093453

      • Facing up to life
        • Skills in existential counselling and psychotherapy, Emmy van Deurzen and Martin Adams, Sage 2011, £19.99, ISBN 978-1412947800

      • Staying together
        • Let’s stay together: your guide to lasting relationships, Jane Butterworth, Sheldon 2011, £8.99, ISBN 978-18470915505

      • Ed, me and recovery
        • Letting go of Ed: a guide to recovering from your eating disorder, Pippa Wilson, O-Books 2011, £9.99, ISBN 978-1846946981

      • Ab/users and c/harmers
        • And no birds sing: exploring the landscapes of personality disorder, Liv Adams, Emic Press 2010, £8.99, ISBN 978-0956731609

      • Pressure points
        • Under pressure: understanding and managing the pressure and stress of work, Denis Sartain and Maria Katsarou, Marshall Cavendish Business 2011, £9.99, ISBN 978-9814302630

      • Survivors of suicide
        • After the suicide: helping the bereaved to find a path from grief to recovery, Kari Dyregrov, Einar Plyhn and Gudrun Dieserud, Jessica Kingsley Publishers 2011, £17.99, ISBN 978-1849052115

    • Talking point Mèlani Halacre
      • Getting unemployed people with disabilities off benefits and into paid work is a hot political topic right now. While I agree disabled people should work if they can, what concerns me is how this is being done

  • BACP
    • BACP News
    • BACP Professional Standards
    • BACP Research
      • BACP Research
        • News and information from the BACP Research department

    • From the Chair
      • From the Chair: The long route to registration Amanda Hawkins
        • The new, voluntary register for counsellors and psychotherapists will shortly come into effect. It has been a long and difficult journey, but new opportunities now beckon

  • TT.net

  • TT.net
    • TT.net extra
      • Behind the pictures Laura Hogan
        • Creating imagery inspired by an authors’ personal experience proved most challenging for illustrator Eda Akaltun

      • Online supervision: protecting young people Richard Bryant-Jefferies
        • Donna has been working as a counsellor for five years and has recently started working at a school. This is a new field of work for her and one that she is passionate about, having wanted to work with young people for a long time. The school takes children from age 12 upwards.

          Michael has been providing her with online supervision for the past year. The session has just begun and he has just asked her where she would like to begin.

      • In conversation Colin Feltham
        • Could poetry provide the missing link between intellect and emotion? Sarah Van Gogh and Colin Feltham discuss

      • Why I became a counsellor Neema Morjaria
        • Neema Morjaria believes the work of a counsellor need not start and end in the therapy room

      • From the archive Clare Pointon
        • Horses for courses. As equine assisted therapy grows in popularity, it would seem that the old proverb ‘there’s nothing so good for the inside of a man as the outside of a horse’ is true, with regard to their intuitive understanding of humans

      • In the news
        • The Government has imposed a temporary ban on the drug methoxetamine pending an investigation by the Advisory Council of the Misuse of Drugs